Tag Archives: bears

Am I doing it right, ma?

We watched this mother bear and her two cubs feasting on the grasses and sedges in the meadow for quite a while. There were so many poses and gestures and moments that we could have filled our cards just with these bears alone that day! I love this one because of the way the cub is looking up at the mother – and again, maybe anthropomorphizing, but it’s almost as if to say ‘is this how we do this, ma?’ I could actually here them tearing the grasses and yes, smacking, too – which is awesome to be close enough to experience that, safely.

In less than 2 weeks I’ll be up there again, meeting my workshop group, only this time it’s during the salmon run, and we hope to capture fishing bears, along with all the other activities. I’m looking forward to getting back there. It’s a barrel of fun and lots of laughs as you watch the cubs play, and every day provides such great photo opportunities!

Thanks for visiting,

 

 

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Black Bear Fishing with Style

I know we’re supposed to not anthropomorphize as wildlife photographers, but how can you not when animals can be just so funny?! 

Each bear develops its own fishing style, and along Anan Creek near Wrangell, Alaska, this black bear had found her niche – pun intended! She settled into a hole in the rushing stream, and would swat at salmon as they came by. Not the most industrious bear, we thought at first, in fact she was so laid back that we nick-named her “Hot Tub Girl” because it was like she was a human sitting in a hot tub, relaxing! She did swat at passing salmon, and missed – as the lead photo shows. I have a lot of funny images where the salmon is getting away. But she did also succeed in catching a meal now and then, too, so who can fault the technique? 

Photographing wildlife is a blast!

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The Power of Gesture

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I know we’re not supposed to anthropomorphize wildlife, but how can you not when they do things that are so, well, human-like? Or at least what we think of as human-like, anyway. I couldn’t help thinking “Is this how I do it, Mom?” when I watched this Spring cub eating sedge alongside mom. Several times it looked up to connect with her, and it just felt like the cub was checking in on whether it was eating the right stuff! Probably instinct…

No matter what, the gesture is what counted the most here. And gesture is so important with any animate object. Gesture brings your subject alive, and this little bear was full of gestures as we watched it mimic Mom and toddle alongside. It’s sibling is ‘buried’ behind the mother’s fluffy body. When the two of them got tired of eating, they’d play; and that’s another image of gesture that I’ll share here, too, when I get done editing my thousands of pictures from the trip.

Thanks for visiting, and share with friends!

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Posted in Brenda Tharp's Photo Blog, nature photography, wildlife photography, workshops & photo tours Also tagged , , , , , , |

The Cutest Grizzly Bears

 

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“Mom? What are those things on two feet back there? They have HUGE glassy eyes pointed at me. There are at least 8 eyes. I’m not sure about this, can I hide behind you?”

OK, so we’re not supposed to anthropomorphize with wildlife, right? But how can we resist when one cute cub peeks out from behind the safety of Mom to watch us? I mean, you can tell it’s so curious, but timid. It hasn’t learned yet that we come in peace, to watch, enjoy, and photograph its antics. And with all those glass lenses pointed at it, no wonder it’s uncertain of things! It flicks an ear and motor-drives whir…

I have such a good time on these bear tours that I lead in Alaska. The bears are very habituated, which makes for photographic opportunities that you would not easily get elsewhere, such as Sows letting their cubs get close to us and having her wander off to feed while we “baby-sit” the cubs! That’s pretty unheard of unless the bears have a trust in us.

For this tour, you don’t have to have extreme telephoto lenses, although they can be useful. I found that my 500mm on a full frame camera was often too close and had to resort to using the 100-400mm on that camera body instead. I used my 70-200mm on my 7D body and the 100-400mm on the Mark III and that setup worked great.

You also don’t have to be an expert at wildlife photography – I’ll be there to help you with settings and techniques for handling longer lenses and shooting action. (It does help to have a good working knowledge of photography and your particular camera, however).

I have only 4 spaces left at this point for the July 2015 tour.  It promises to be another great year for bear photography!

 

Enjoy, and thanks for visiting,

 

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 “I can see my toes!”

Posted in Brenda Tharp's Photo Blog, nature photography, Photo Blog, photography, The Blog, wildlife photography, workshops & photo tours Also tagged , , , , , , , |